KEY POINTS:

  • IMAGINATION (LOTS OF IT)
  • THINK LIKE A CHILD
  • MAKE THE DIALOGUE FUN
  • HAVE THE DIALOGUE ASK QUESTIONS CHILDREN OFTEN ASK AND THEN ANSWER THEM
  • KEEP IT SIMPLE
  • READ DIFFERENT CHILDREN BOOKS

 

IMAGINATION is one of the key aspects to anything in life and in children's books you will have to exercise it to your max potential. Picture a boy who goes off on a quest to find a giant balloon, more immensely colossal than the size of his hut in his village. He encounters creatures of all sorts; those who want to avail him find this massive balloon and others who want to illude the boy so that they can victual him. Playing with these key conceptions alone can put you on a frolicsome inditing journey and who knows where you might end up.

THINK LIKE A CHILD, that's the way to go, if not then you'll probably bore your young readers asleep. It's consequential to ask yourself what would a child say, feel or do. If you have children of your own or know someone who does, perfect, listen to them. Listen to how they play and react to one another and even to adults, then implement this into your story. 

MAKE THE DIALOGUE FUN, why else would kids be fascinated with your characters if they're just plain out dull? Even in non fiction books there are characters who verbally express outlandish things, things that makes readers say "ah" or "ha ha ha". Integrate jests into the commix, jests that may sound silly to an adult but will make KIDS laugh. How do you do that? Watch one episode of Spongebob or any animated Disney films. Watch how the experts make their "words play".

HAVE THE DIALOGUE ASK QUESTIONS CHILDREN OFTEN ASK AND THEN ANSWER THEM. This alone intrigues your young readers to dive even deeper into the story that you optate to tell. This especially applies to long chaptered books going over 300 pages. What keeps children motivated to read more usually stems from their unanswered questions which the characters in the story are endeavoring to answer.

KEEP IT SIMPLE, you don't want to do too much by adding unnecessary jargon or big words. These are kids we're talking about people; stick to words like "hardheaded" or "stubborn" instead of "obstinate" or "intransigent". If you have your young readers going back and forth to the dictionary way too often then, more than likely, you'll end up losing a reader. 

READ DIFFERENT CHILDREN BOOKS, that's right, it's not about beating your prosperous competitors of the juvenile genre, its about knowing why and how they succeeded. And what better way to learn then from "thy enemy"? Except no one is genuinely your enemy. The only enemy is your pen and paper or that keyboard and monitor in front of you. Reading other successful authors work not only amend yours but it may also inspire you to take a 360 approach to how you may want to convey your story differently.

Good fun writing  -

Bernard Noel

Check out my book where I first used this process - 






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